About

Doesn’t everyone secretly rate everything around them? Don’t you sometimes wish you could share your ratings with the world?

Here’s my view on the world using an easy 1-10 rating system (portable score cards and everything!). Feel free to rebut or appeal any and all ratings… or add your own.

It’s time to make rating your world a little more public.

THE CREATION

While goofing off during our usual Sunday morning climb at the Chapel Hill Community Center (climbing walls there= 7), I made the decision to start focusing more on my grace on the wall. I found that as I was attacking more difficult routes, my style was suffering. Jim reminded me of this with his almost ballet-like climbing skills, as opposed to my grasshopper style.

So, I asked Paul, Jay and Alyssa to start rating my climbs based on grace, not completion. After each attempt they gave me a score of 0-10 (hence where the system originated). After playing around with this for a while we decided to create some laminated score cards and attach them to our harnesses, almost creating a new form of stylicized (?) climbing. From there we quickly realized this was too fabulous to limit itself exclusively to the world of climbing, and that our rating system could be applied to everything from climbing style to pull up strength to store window displays. We all judge in our heads anyways, why not put it out there with an actual numerical rating?

And the experiment was born.

Part of this sociophyschological experiment is to create discussion and sharing of ideas from the expression of honest opinions on anything–situations, thoughts, and maybe even people. To attain this, the idea is for each one of us to be able to identify what earns something a certain score (a 10 for instance) in our minds, be able to articulate/discuss it, and then allow other people to weigh in with their perspectives or ratings. The final goal here would be for people to be able to understand or at least gain an appreciation and tolerance for the other peoples’ opinions that are now “out there”.  ~Paul Alabanza

THE SYSTEM

Along with the actual rating, there should also be an explanation of how points were earned (for quantification purposes). For example, a dinner out can be rated for the overall dining experience, service, and/or food quality. This ties into the spirit of the experiment… ~Paul Alabanza

You can only rate 0-10. While tempting to score something awesome above a ten, or something horrible below a 0, to maintain the norms you have to stay within 0-10. However, half points are allowed. Sometimes even other decimals…

Also, no rating of people.  Ever.  You can rate their choices, decisions, outfits, etc. but not the actual person.  The rating system is not intended to hurt any feelings.

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4 comments

  1. Addendum to “The Creation”: Part of this sociophyschological experiment is to create discussion and sharing of ideas from the expression of honest opinions on anything–situations, thoughts, and maybe even people. To attain this, the idea is for each one of us to be able to identify what earns something a certain score (a 10 for instance) in our minds, be able to articulate/discuss it, and then allow other people to weigh in with their perspectives or ratings. The final goal here would be for people to be able to understand or at least gain an appreciation and tolerance for the other peoples’ opinions that are now “out there”.

    Addendum to “The System”: Along with the actual rating, there should also be an explanation of how points were earned (for quantification purposes). For example, a dinner out can be rated for the overall dining experience, service, and/or food quality. This ties into the spirit of the experiment…

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